Dienstag, September 27, 2005

Thanks, France and Germany!

Great. The Chinese Navy is starting to field its first modern domestic frigate. It's undertaking a massive expansion of its navy. It's not the only new design.

And where did they get the anti-air missiles? France: an advanced version of the Crotale. The command and control systems? Gee, could it be France? And the anti-shipping missile? Based on a French design...

And where did they get the engines? France, the same engines that France uses in its frigates.

But wait, there's a second source for the engines: it's MTU, the German engine specialist for marine engines and relatively small turbines for the aerospace industry.

And it's a stealth design, based on... what could it be... a French design? Of their Lafayette class?

Just brilliant. Thanks, France and Germany!

I guess for France it's an answer for all those weapon the US sold to Germany in the 1920s and 1930s. Just desserts, eh?

What?


Waddya mean the US didn't sell Germany weapons in the 1920s and 1930s? Well why then are the French selling the Chinese these weapons?

Because France and Germany are countries that give capitalism a bad name.


Thanks fellas. We'll remember this when the next time comes around to ask you to give us a hand solving some sticky problem that your incompetence brought around in the first place. And remember, if China starts a war, maybe over Taiwan or maybe over some gas fields in the China Sea, you've got our buddies in Paris and Berlin to thank for increasing Chinese abilities to wage war well above and beyond their domestic abilities.

Idiots. I'm really starting to think that Marx was right about European capitalists. The Europeans probably have plans to sell to any thuggish regime with lots of cash.

Oh, they already have? Gee, what a surprise.


Kommentare:

What I know hat gesagt…

I can certify that my father was working during the war for a company that was selling to the Germans during the war.

Sales were made tru Brazil and Swuizerland.

Do not be so naive. If you have got money you get what you want!!


Check your facts.

But keep posting I like your blog very much.

Yours

Annonymous for good reaons
( I am sure you understand I do not want hate mail)

John F. Opie hat gesagt…

Read what I said: not during the war, before the war. In the 1920s and 1930s.

The Russians were helping the Germans rearm during that period. Ford of Germany was involved as well, but that's not, per se, an American company.

What I am referring to is the hidden agendas and hidden arms dealing that accompanied the collapse of the Weimar Republic and the rise of German fascism.

And I'm not naive: I want the Chinese to have to develop the weapons themselves, instead of having our erstwhile "friends" sell them the technology so that they can skip a couple of generations of technological development.

And I don't like anonymous even for "good reasons": if you can't take the heat, stay out of the kitchen.

But by all means keep on reading. :-)

John

Ralf hat gesagt…

John,

take a look at this:

British sale of Searchwater radar?

In the October 1996 issue of Taiwan Communiqué we also reported on Defense News reports that Britain's Racal Electronics plc. was considering selling a 40-million British pounds Searchwater naval radar system to the Chinese for installation on Y-8 aircraft operating in the Taiwan Straits and the areas around the Paracels and Spratley's.

A recent Defense News issue reported that the delivery of up to eight over-the-horizon systems are now pending ("China, Britain seal deal for Searchwater radar", Defense News, 20-26 January 1997).


Taiwan Communiqué No. 74, February 1997

It was only due to these British radar systems that the incident where the American plane was grounded after colliding with a Chinese could happen.

Or, for another example, where did China get it's missile technology from?


Officials said one of the most damaging illegal technology exports to China took place in the late 1990s. In that case, China secretly
obtained technology related to the Aegis battle management system, used in the most modern U.S. warships. A Chinese front company won a contract from the system manufacturer and then stole details about Aegis, according to FBI counterintelligence officials.

By 2004, China had deployed its first two Luyang II guided-missile destroyers, both equipped with the Chinese version of the Aegis system.

The Aegis system is used for tracking and shooting at enemy aircraft and also is the heart of the Navy's new sea-based missile defense.

Earlier, in 1997, two American satellite companies, Space Systems/Loral and Hughes Space and Communications Co., violated U.S.

export laws when they helped China fix an electrical glitch in the Long March space launch booster, which had direct applications for Chinese long-range missiles. Those missiles are aimed at U.S. cities.


In 2002, Loral agreed to pay a $20 million fine for passing the missile data, and in 2003, Boeing Satellite Systems Inc., which purchased Hughes, agreed to pay $32 million in fines.


Chinese technology theft on the rise, U.S. says

So, two American companies sell China, among other things, the technology it needs to target American cities with nuclear weapons, and they get, but comparison, both a slap on the wrist? I'm shocked, shocked, I tell you.

Ralf hat gesagt…

John,

take a look at this:

British sale of Searchwater radar ?

In the October 1996 issue of Taiwan Communiqué we also reported on Defense News reports that Britain's Racal Electronics plc. was considering selling a 40-million British pounds Searchwater naval radar system to the Chinese for installation on Y-8 aircraft operating in the Taiwan Straits and the areas around the Paracels and Spratley's.

A recent Defense News issue reported that the delivery of up to eight over-the-horizon systems are now pending ("China, Britain seal deal for Searchwater radar", Defense News, 20-26 January 1997).


Taiwan Communiqué No. 74, February 1997

It was only due to these British radar systems that the incident where the American plane was grounded after colliding with a Chinese
could happen.

Or, for another example, where did China get it's missile technology from?


Officials said one of the most damaging illegal technology exports to China took place in the late 1990s. In that case, China secretly obtained technology related to the Aegis battle management system, used in the most modern U.S. warships.

A Chinese front company won a contract from the system manufacturer and then stole details about Aegis, according to FBI counterintelligence officials.

By 2004, China had deployed its first two Luyang II guided-missile destroyers, both equipped with the Chinese version of the Aegis system.

The Aegis system is used for tracking and shooting at enemy aircraft and also is the heart of the Navy's new sea-based missile defense.

Earlier, in 1997, two American satellite companies, Space Systems/Loral and Hughes Space and Communications Co., violated U.S. export laws when they helped China fix an electrical glitch in the Long March space launch booster, which had direct applications for Chinese long-range missiles. Those missiles are aimed at U.S. cities.

In 2002, Loral agreed to pay a $20 million fine for passing the missile data, and in 2003, Boeing Satellite Systems Inc., which purchased Hughes, agreed to pay $32 million in fines.

Chinese technology theft on the rise, U.S. says

So, two American companies sell China, among other things, the technology it needs to target American cities with nuclear weapons, and they get, but comparison, both a slap on the wrist? I'm shocked, shocked, I tell you.

John F. Opie hat gesagt…

Ralf -

For some reason your post is now up there twice. :-p

Your points are correct: it's not only the French and Germans.

However, the French and Germans really seem to have a national policy of selling, rather than the isolated cases of US companies. And the loss of Aegis was the result of classic spying, rather than commercial duplicity.

All in all it's a dog's dinner. Can't understand why this isn't getting more notice, but then again, it probably won't until the shooting starts...and then it's too late.

Ralf hat gesagt…

Hi John,

sorry about the late response, but I was travelling and generally busy.

Look, the 'isolated cases of US companies' are not all that isolated:

U.S. Continues to Lead in World Arms Exports

You can say that America has a more strategic outlook, and mayb better foresight which countries might be trouble in the future, but in sheer volume of sales are leading.

John F. Opie hat gesagt…

Hi Ralf -

Your point is legitmate: however, there are more considerations here than I want to cover in a comment.

I'll post some more complete in a day or two when I come up for air...

John